Car runs into the bar of Adelaide’s Selborne Hotel

selborne hotel pirie street 1934.jpeg

Selbourne Hotel, Adelaide 1935. Photo: State Library of South Australia.

A MISBEHAVED MOTOR

RUNS INTO HOTEL BAR.

ADELAIDE. Tuesday. The unexplained vagaries of a motor car caused some excitement in Pirie-street today. After capsizing a buggy, it swung across the road, knocked down a cyclist, missed a row of verandah posts by fractions of an inch, threw two boys to the ground, breaking the leg of one, and finally came to a standstill in the bar of the Serborne Hotel, after crashing through the plate glass window. The driver was unable to explain the misbehavior of the vehicle.

– The Perth Daily News Tuesday 22 January 1924

The Selborne Hotel was located at 44 Pirie Street (north side), Adelaide, about 33 metres west of Gawler Place, and had a frontage of about 14 metres.

The Selborne Hotel was an early meeting place for the United Trades and Labor Council. Major alterations were made to the pub in 1936, when it was almost entirely rebuilt.

The Selborne Hotel traded from 1887 to 1936. The photograph below was taken on the opening day of the Hotel Adelaide, which replaced the Selbourne, on March 24 1936. At the time the proprietor was T.F. Dollard, and manager P.W. O’Neil.

The hotel closed for business on April 25 1970.

Hotel Adelaide, which replaced the Selborne Hotel. This photo is believed to have been taken in 1936. Picture: State Library of Adelaide

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Categories: Adelaide hotels, South Australia Hotels

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3 replies

  1. Title should read Selborne, not Serborne, or have (sic) after it.

  2. I’m interested in any connection between the Selborne Hotel and the Muirden Brothers’ Adelaide Shorthand Institute (also in Pirie Street) in the late 1880s and early 1890s. Were they close by and was there any connection other than geographic proximity?

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